Great for Entertaining! Lamb Main Dishes Recipes

Grilled Lamb Ribeye Stuffed with Spinach

June 10, 2016
Stuffed Lamb Ribeye

Boneless lamb ribeye is a unique cut because of its versatility and flavor. Derived from the succulent rack, the cut retains its fat cap to hold in moisture and adds a crusty exterior when roasted or grilled. Here, slice the meat nearly to the fat, pack with a spinach, pine nut and tomato bruschetta filling, tie and grill. It’s a beautiful presentation that’s easy to prepare and makes a great company meal. It’s tasty, too and will wow your guests.

Grilled Lamb Ribeye Stuffed with Spinach Recipe

Two – 2 lb boneless, rolled lamb ribeye roasts, string netting removed

1/2 cup finely minced onion

4 cloves garlic, minced

2 cups spinach leaves, chiffonaded

1/2 cup fresh basil leaves, chiffonaded

Note: for the chiffonade, stack basil leaves and spinach leaves in separate piles. Thinly slice basil and spinach into thin strips, discarding any tough stems.

basil chiffonade

A chiffonade is a simple method of creating narrow strips from leafy herbs and vegetables. Here try the method for basil and spinach, part of the stuffing.

4 T chunky tomato bruschetta

2 ounce package pine nuts, chopped

2 T Italian seasoning, divided

4 T olive oil, divided

kitchen string, 8 pieces cut into 12 inch segments

Warm 2 T olive oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté for 3 minutes, or until lightly golden but not browned.

Add spinach, basil, tomato bruschetta and pine nuts to skillet, stirring to incorporate. Sprinkle with 1 T Italian seasoning, mixing to combine. Cook until spinach and basil are wilted, about 2 minutes. Salt and pepper to taste. Remove to small bowl. Let cool.

Slice meat through thickest part almost down to fat cap on both ribeye roasts. Slide kitchen string underneath roast in four spots about 2 inches apart. When stuffing is cool to enough to touch, pack slit with stuffing. Roll roast over itself and tie with kitchen string.

stuffed lamb ribeye

Make sure you pack the stuffing into the lamb after it’s cool enough to touch. This makes sense for two reasons: first, to avoid burning your fingers, and second, to prevent bacterial growth.

If not grilling immediately, place tied roasts on baking sheet and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature one hour before cooking.

stuffed lamb ribeye

Neat and tidy, the rolled and stuffed lamb ribeye is ready to grill or roast.

To grill:

Drizzle 2 T olive oil over lamb and sprinkle with remaining tablespoon Italian seasoning.

Heat grill to medium-high and sear lamb well on all sides to brown. Place lamb ribeyes in roasting pan and return to grill. Lower grill lid and roast lamb at 350°F until it reaches desired temperature on an insta-read thermometer: 145°F for medium-rare, 160°F for medium and 170°F for well done.

Remove to cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes, then slice into 1 inch thick pieces. Remember that the internal temperature will continue to rise by about 10 degrees after removing from grill.

Stuffed Lamb Ribeye

A little prep. Beautiful presentation. Serve stuffed lamb ribeye with steamed asparagus and couscous to keep the meal simple, yet elegant.

A Rafanelli Zinfandel

Want to continue to “wow” your guests? Stephanie Davis, a wine educator with entertaining podcasts on WineTwoFive, says spend a little extra and get ten times the wine. Her opinion of Zinfandel changed completely after trying out a top Zinfandel producer, such as A. Rafanelli. Stephanie says your opinion of lamb will be forever influenced, as well. Priced about $45/bottle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Award-winning author Emily Kemme writes about human nature, illuminating the everyday in a way that highlights its brilliance. Follow her on her blog, Feeding the Famished,  https://www.facebook.com/EmilyKemme, or on Twitter @EmFeedsYou . Life inspired. Vodka tempered.

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Award-winning Chick Lit author Emily Kemme writes about the quirks of human nature. Find musings, recipes, and satire on her blog, Feeding the Famished. Novels | Drinking the Knock Water: A New Age Pilgrimage | In Search of Sushi Tora | Other works in progress

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